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About Deviant Artist Senior Member Charles S. FallisMale/United States Recent Activity
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Agfa Isolette I by FallisPhoto
Agfa Isolette I
This is an Agfa Isolette I, the first in a series of Isolette cameras, all built on the same frame, from Agfa. Isolettes had two big problems. The first was that they used a vinyl coated cardboard for the bellows and it typically developed pinholes after about a year (or even less). The other was that they used a cheap grease to lubricate the focusing helicals that had no galvanic resistance. This was a problem because the top cap is chromed brass. The two different metals, chromium and brass, in direct contact with one another reacted and generated a very slight electrical current. It wasn't much at all, but over decades, it caused the grease to polymerize and form molecular chains of what is essentially a type of plastic. The result of all this is that the front and center lens elements, which screw together and apart to focus, are stuck together on nearly all of the older cameras with a green substance that  is about the same consistency as road tar. If you are patient, you can soak the lens elements apart with alcohol over about two weeks or a month; if not, the only thing that will soften that gunk enough to force it loose enough to turn is heat. If you look in my journal, under really REALLY bad camera repair ideas, you will find a number of stories about people who didn't know what to do who attempted to repair Agfas. They are good cameras, were popular and are exceptionally easy to screw up. Well, this one has a set of "new old stock" Kodak replacement bellows (really meant for a Kodak 66, but a perfect fit) and the old grease has been removed and replaced with a much higher grade grease. It has been cleaned, lubricated, adjusted and works perfectly. 6x6 replacement bellows from Zeiss and Balda will also fit, but the bellows from Weltas will not, since they used a differently sized shutter and so they are made to fit a larger front standard. All things considered, the Kodak bellows are probably the best bet, since bellows were one of the few things Kodak did really well, they are usually less expensive (because the rest of a Kodak 66 was crap), and they are robust enough to give you many years of service.
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Voigtlander Bessa by FallisPhoto
Voigtlander Bessa
This is an entirely original Voigtlander Bessa. It has been cleaned, lubricated and adjusted and it works as it should. It has been detailed and polished, so it looks good too. It takes 5x9cm negatives on 120 medium format roll film. This is one of those that I wanted to leave looking old, but well maintained, so I didn't generally repaint it and left a few small places, along metal edges, with the paint worn through. You can see a few of them on the viewfinder cover, for example. Some cameras just look better if you don't try to make them look like they were made two days ago.
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Konica C35 by FallisPhoto
Konica C35
This is a 35mm Konica C35 zone focusing autoexposure camera. It has been cleaned, lubricated, adjusted, has new light seals, has been detailed and it works perfectly. The thing is only slightly larger than a pack of cigarettes.
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For me, these would be a Diana that split in half during the first roll of film, for no readily apparent reason, a Holga with a back that kept falling off in mid-roll, and a Minolta Freedom that suddenly jammed solid halfway through the second roll of film. I was so mad that I literally stomped the Holga to death. The Diana was so flimsy that I accidentally dropped a plastic part a part while gluing it back together and it shattered like glass, so that got trashed. The Minolta just went straight into the trash can and I got out my SLR. I have since discovered that old box cameras, of certain types, give you EXACTLY the same kinds of photos that toy cameras do, you don't have to tape them up, the backs won't come off mid-roll, they are much more ruggedly built and won't shatter, and they even look better.
Yashica Mat LM -- left side by FallisPhoto
Yashica Mat LM -- left side
This is a Yashica Mat LM, a twin lens reflex camera (TLR). The top lens is used for focusing and the bottom lens takes the photo. When you focus it, the front plate of the camera, holding both lenses, moves in and out. You look into a big ground glass viewfinder in the top and stop when the image is in focus. The LM stands for light meter. This one is an extreme rarity, because the selenium cell light meter still works (although I am not sure about the accuracy of a very old meter powered by a selenium cell -- they usually have a ten year lifespan and this is from the 60s). It has a very sharp Yashinon lens and a Copal SV shutter. The shutter speeds are from 1 to 1/500th second plus B. The f/stops go from f/3.5 to f/32. Everything works as it is supposed to, including the self-timer. It has been releathered with something called "Griptac," a textured vulcanized rubber camera covering that is supposed to give you a better grip. Originally, it came with a vinyl covering. The original covering was brittle and had broken off in one corner of the front plate.
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deviantID

FallisPhoto
Charles S. Fallis
Artist
United States
Current Residence: darkroom
Favourite photographer: Jerry Uelsmann and J.K Potter
Favourite style of art: surreal nudes (darkroom manipulations)
Personal Quote: "Great photos are created, not captured." -- Ansel Adams
Interests
Apertures and f/stops are not quite the same thing. An aperture is the size of the hole that the light passes through in order to expose the film. It is not complicated. f/stops are a set of standardized numbers used in mathematical formulas that are used to determine the size of the aperture. The "f" in f/stop is the focal length of the lens. Thus, if you have a 22mm lens, and you are shooting at f/2, then 22/2 = 11mm, which is the size of the aperture. If you are shooting at f/22, then 22/22 = 1mm, which will be the size of the aperture. Each progressive aperture, going from the largest number (let's say 22) to the smallest (let's say 2) admits twice the light into the camera that the preceding number does.

Shutter speeds are set up the same way. Starting from the fastest shutter speed (let's say 1/1000th second) and going to the slowest (let's say 30 seconds; but there really isn't a limit to how slow you can go -- some people with film cameras have used shutter speeds of a year or more), each progressive shutter speed admits twice the light into the camera as the preceding one.

Because they are set up this way, it allows you to use what are called "equivalent exposures." Let's say that your camera's meter is recommending an exposure of 1/125th second at f/11. Well, you decide that you want a little less depth of field than this. Depth of field is what the aperture controls and it is the amount of space in front of and behind the subject of the photo that will be in focus. To get less depth of field, you'd switch from f/11 to f/8; this admits twice as much light into the camera and without making an adjustment, your photo will be overexposed. To compensate for this, you switch from 1/125th second to 1/250th second, reducing the light by half (back to its previous level). Now you have an equivalent exposure that has the depth of field that you want. Simple.

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:iconanorexianevrosa:
anorexianevrosa Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Happy Birthday!
I feel very sorry for the death of your mother... Everything is gonna be fine, just don't worry~! Be strong and happy!
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner 2 days ago
Thank you, but nothing is going to be fine and being happy is an awfully tall order. Kind of sick too.
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:iconanorexianevrosa:
anorexianevrosa Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, I know.. What you said now is so correct..
I believe the time will make you forget..
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Edited 2 days ago
Thanks, everyone, but this is about the unhappiest birthday ever. In the last two weeks, my mother died (leukemia), I had four strokes and I had a grand mal seizure that almost killed me.  I'm still recovering from all that, the drugs I have to take make me feel sick and woozy and I won't be able to drive for at least the next six months. My world has pretty much turned to shit.
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:iconbrooklyn47:
Brooklyn47 Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Happy Birthday!
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner 2 days ago
Thanks, but this is about the unhappiest birthday ever. In the last two weeks, my mother died (leukemia), I had four strokes and I had a grand mal seizure that almost killed me.  I'm still recovering from all that, the drugs I have to take make me feel sick and woozy and I won't be able to drive for at least the next six months. My world has pretty much turned to shit.
Reply
:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Happy Birthday! 
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner 2 days ago
Thanks, but this is about the unhappiest birthday ever. In the last two weeks, my mother died (leukemia), I had four strokes and I had a grand mal seizure that almost killed me.  I'm still recovering from all that, the drugs I have to take make me feel sick and woozy and I won't be able to drive for at least the next six months. My world has pretty much turned to shit.
Reply
:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
I am sorry to hear that.... try to keep your mind positive, i know it's hard, but never give up!

Wishing you all the best!
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner 2 days ago
I am an Asatruar. Not giving up is a way of life to me.
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