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About Deviant Artist Senior Member Charles S. FallisMale/United States Recent Activity
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Agra Isolette I by FallisPhoto
Agra Isolette I
This is an Agfa Isolette I, the first in a series of Isolette cameras, all built on the same frame, from Agfa. Isolettes had two big problems. The first was that they used a vinyl coated cardboard for the bellows and it typically developed pinholes after about a year (or even less). The other was that they used a cheap grease to lubricate the focusing helicals that had no galvanic resistance. This was a problem because the top cap is chromed brass. The two different metals, chromium and brass, in direct contact with one another reacted and generated a very slight electrical current. It wasn't much at all, but over decades, it caused the grease to polymerize and form molecular chains of what is essentially a type of plastic. The result of all this is that the front and center lens elements, which screw together and apart to focus, are stuck together on nearly all of the older cameras with a green substance that  is about the same consistency as road tar. Well, this one has a set of "new old stock" Kodak replacement bellows (really meant for a Kodak 66, but a perfect fit) and the old grease has been removed and replaced with a much higher grade grease. It has been cleaned, lubricated, adjusted and works perfectly.
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Voigtlander Bessa by FallisPhoto
Voigtlander Bessa
This is an entirely original Voigtlander Bessa. It has been cleaned, lubricated and adjusted and it works as it should. It has been detailed and polished, so it looks good too. It takes 5x9cm negatives on 120 medium format roll film. This is one of those that I wanted to leave looking old, but well maintained, so I didn't generally repaint it and left a few small places, along metal edges, with the paint worn through. You can see a few of them on the viewfinder cover, for example. Some cameras just look better if you don't try to make them look like they were made two days ago.
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Konica C35 by FallisPhoto
Konica C35
This is a 35mm Konica C35 zone focusing autoexposure camera. It has been cleaned, lubricated, adjusted, has new light seals, has been detailed and it works perfectly. The thing is only slightly larger than a pack of cigarettes.
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For me, these would be a Diana that split in half during the first roll of film, for no readily apparent reason, a Holga with a back that kept falling off in mid-roll, and a Minolta Freedom that suddenly jammed solid halfway through the second roll of film. I was so mad that I literally stomped the Holga to death. The Diana was so flimsy that I accidentally dropped a plastic part a part while gluing it back together and it shattered like glass, so that got trashed. The Minolta just went straight into the trash can and I got out my SLR. I have since discovered that old box cameras, of certain types, give you EXACTLY the same kinds of photos that toy cameras do, you don't have to tape them up, the backs won't come off mid-roll, they are much more ruggedly built and won't shatter, and they even look better.
Yashica Mat LM -- left side by FallisPhoto
Yashica Mat LM -- left side
This is a Yashica Mat LM, a twin lens reflex camera (TLR). The top lens is used for focusing and the bottom lens takes the photo. When you focus it, the front plate of the camera, holding both lenses, moves in and out. You look into a big ground glass viewfinder in the top and stop when the image is in focus. The LM stands for light meter. This one is an extreme rarity, because the selenium cell light meter still works (although I am not sure about the accuracy of a very old meter powered by a selenium cell -- they usually have a ten year lifespan and this is from the 60s). It has a very sharp Yashinon lens and a Copal SV shutter. The shutter speeds are from 1 to 1/500th second plus B. The f/stops go from f/3.5 to f/32. Everything works as it is supposed to, including the self-timer. It has been releathered with something called "Griptac," a textured vulcanized rubber camera covering that is supposed to give you a better grip. Originally, it came with a vinyl covering. The original covering was brittle and had broken off in one corner of the front plate.
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deviantID

FallisPhoto
Charles S. Fallis
Artist
United States
Current Residence: darkroom
Favourite photographer: Jerry Uelsmann and J.K Potter
Favourite style of art: surreal nudes (darkroom manipulations)
Personal Quote: "Great photos are created, not captured." -- Ansel Adams
Interests
Apertures and f/stops are not quite the same thing. An aperture is the size of the hole that the light passes through in order to expose the film. It is not complicated. f/stops are a set of standardized numbers used in mathematical formulas that are used to determine the size of the aperture. The "f" in f/stop is the focal length of the lens. Thus, if you have a 22mm lens, and you are shooting at f/2, then 22/2 = 11mm, which is the size of the aperture. If you are shooting at f/22, then 22/22 = 1mm, which will be the size of the aperture. Each progressive aperture, going from the largest number (let's say 22) to the smallest (let's say 2) admits twice the light into the camera that the preceding number does.

Shutter speeds are set up the same way. Starting from the fastest shutter speed (let's say 1/1000th second) and going to the slowest (let's say 30 seconds; but there really isn't a limit to how slow you can go -- some people with film cameras have used shutter speeds of a year or more), each progressive shutter speed admits twice the light into the camera as the preceding one.

Because they are set up this way, it allows you to use what are called "equivalent exposures." Let's say that your camera's meter is recommending an exposure of 1/125th second at f/11. Well, you decide that you want a little less depth of field than this. Depth of field is what the aperture controls and it is the amount of space in front of and behind the subject of the photo that will be in focus. To get less depth of field, you'd switch from f/11 to f/8; this admits twice as much light into the camera and without making an adjustment, your photo will be overexposed. To compensate for this, you switch from 1/125th second to 1/250th second, reducing the light by half (back to its previous level). Now you have an equivalent exposure that has the depth of field that you want. Simple.

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:iconpmcdoctah:
PmcDoctah Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hi there, do you know any good starter cameras for taking professional pictures of products that are going to be listed on a online shop?
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Edited Jul 19, 2015
If this is just going to be online, and if you are not making prints,... well, the best computer monitors known to man only can resolve about 4mp, so pretty much any compact camera can do it. Personally, I'd recommend a Canon A-series for that. Doesn't cost too much, gives good results, has intuitive controls, and is just easy to use. It's what I use when posting the photos of my restored vintage cameras. Take a look and see. Now if you are going to make prints, on the other hand, a DSLR is what you want, and you want one with enough megapixels to make the prints in the size you want. 15mp is enough for an 8x10 print, 20 or so will do 11x14. If you want bigger prints than that, you really need a medium format camera, because you'll get a bigger lens along with a bigger sensor and will get enough detail that you can blow it up to a large size without losing the detail you would with a small format camera.
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:iconpmcdoctah:
PmcDoctah Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for the advice. I was referring to online pics only, so thank you for the suggestion I'll buy just that specific camera.
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:iconjustinmlindner:
JustinMLindner Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
I followed you on ebay so I can keep an eye on what cameras you have available.  The 3 on there now look pretty cool, definitely have an antique look to them 
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2014
Four of them are on there now. All are Kodak Retinas and all of them date from the very early 40 and 50s (yes, at least one was made in Nazi Germany). Three of them are rangefinders and one is a ranging camera. A rangefinder tells you the distance to the subject very precisely. Rangefinders focus more precisely than any other kind of camera. With a ranging camera, you don't get that. You estimate the distance to the subject and rely on depth of field (area in front of and behind the subject that is in reasonably sharp focus) to compensate for error. Anyway, those are vintage, not antique. Antiques are 100+ years old (I have a few).
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:iconjustinmlindner:
JustinMLindner Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
oh I only saw 3.  The Nazi Germany thing doesn't phase me, I'd love to get my hands on a German Mauser from that era so I really don't mind. they had good engineers so I don't feel bad about wanting stuff they built. 

would those work for school? 
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2015
BTW, I had two German Mausers, an 8mm Chilean Mauser and a 7mm German Mauser (both made in Germany). They have the best receivers ever and the receivers are in high demand for custom gun work.
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(1 Reply)
:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2014
It would depend on what the course requirements are. Those are rangefinder cameras. If the course requirements say you have to have an SLR, as some do, then they won't work.

Oh hell,  just remembered that one of them, the Kodak Retina Reflex III, is an SLR (of sorts). Technically, it would fulfill your course requirements, but it would be way behind the capabilities of every other camera in the class. You really want a Nikon, Canon, Pentax, Yashica, Minolta, Olympus or something similar if you are taking this course seriously.
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(1 Reply)
:icontlo-photography:
TLO-Photography Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Happy Birthday Charles!! :D
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:iconfallisphoto:
FallisPhoto Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2014
Thank you, I guess. I wasn't really looking forward to 60 though.
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